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Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of Mean velocities and Reynolds stresses upstream of a simulated wing-fuselage juncture found in the catalog.

Mean velocities and Reynolds stresses upstream of a simulated wing-fuselage juncture

H McMahon

Mean velocities and Reynolds stresses upstream of a simulated wing-fuselage juncture

by H McMahon

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  • 5 Currently reading

Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Scientific and Technical Information Branch, For sale by the National Technical Information Service] in Washington, D.C, [Springfield, Va .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Turbulent boundary layer -- Statistics,
  • Reynolds stress -- Statistics,
  • Airplanes -- Wings -- Statistics

  • Edition Notes

    StatementH. McMahon, J. Hubbartt, and L. R. Kubendran ; prepared for Langley Research Center
    SeriesNASA contractor report -- 3695
    ContributionsHubbartt, J, Kubendran, L, Georgia Institute of Technology, Langley Research Center, United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Scientific and Technical Information Branch
    The Physical Object
    Pagination167 p. :
    Number of Pages167
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14931190M

      b. Make actual or simulated installation of attachment in the aircraft or preferably on a jig using the applicable static test load factors. c. Determine the critical ultimate load factors for the up, down, side, fore, and aft directions. A hypothetical example which . Large-Eddy Simulation of a Wing–Body Junction Flow However, mean flow structure and Reynolds stress anisotropy at the corner region in the symmetry plane were not discussed in the papers. In this paper, we describe the large-eddy simulation (LES) further upstream at .

      The Reynolds stress transport model simulated the anisotropic behavior of the normal Reynolds stresses and ampliï¬ cation of longitudinal vorticity. the mean velocities and the turbulence values show that higher-speed lower-turbulence free-stream ï¬ uid has moved downward close to the wall near the wing, which indicates a streamwise. STRUCTURAL STRESS Learning Objective: Identify the five basic stresses acting on an aircraft. Primary factors in aircraft structures are strength, weight, and reliability. These three factors determine the requirements to be met by any material used in airframe construction and repair. Airframes must be strong and light in weight.

      Here, u i are the mean (phase-resolved) velocities, x i are the Cartesian coordinates, t is time, p is the pressure, ν is the fluid kinematic viscosity, ρ is the fluid density and τ ij is the Reynolds stress tensor, which accounts for additional (normal and shear) stresses due to momentum transfer from turbulent fluctuations. Throughout the present work, the Reynolds stress tensor will be Cited by: Start studying Stability. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. - permits you to maneuver the airplane easily and allows it to withstand the stress resulting from maneuvers - determined by the airplanes size, weight, flight controls, structual strength, and thrust What does it mean when the.


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Mean velocities and Reynolds stresses upstream of a simulated wing-fuselage juncture by H McMahon Download PDF EPUB FB2

SUMMARY Values of three mean velocity components and six turbulence stresses measured in a turbulent shear layer upstream of a simulated wing-fuselage juncture and immediately downstream of the start of the juncture are presented and Size: 5MB. Get this from a library.

Mean velocities and Reynolds stresses upstream of a simulated wing-fuselage juncture. [H McMahon; J Hubbartt; L Kubendran; Georgia Institute of Technology.; Langley Research Center.; United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Scientific and Technical Information Branch.].

Values of three mean velocity components and six turbulence stresses measured in a turbulent shear layer upstream of a simulated wing-fuselage juncture and immediately downstream of the start of the juncture are presented nd discussed.

Two single-sensor hot-wire probes were used in the : J. Hubbartt, L. Kubendran and H. Mcmahon. The time-dependent and time-averaged features of a wing-body junction flow formed around a cylindrical wing with a elliptical nose and NACA tail are being studied.

In this paper, velocity and skin friction measurements made in the nose region are presented and by: Results are presented on the first four moments of the three fluctuating velocities and Reynolds shear stress down to a wall distance of y+ = Author: Steven Deutsch. The Wilcox stress-ωmodel, a Reynolds stress model (RSM), implemented in both the NASA Langley codes FUN3D and CFL3D have been used to study a number of 2-D and 3-D cases.

This study continues the assessments of the stress-ω model by simulating the flow over two wings: the DPW-W1 and the DLR-F11 wings. Using FUN3D, which usesFile Size: 4MB.

Upstream of the last (most upstream) ‘identifiable’ vortex there occurs a saddle point and then upstream of this is a node (ready to change into an identifiable vortex, if the Reynolds number Cited by: 1. In the time mean the resulting separated flow consists of two fairly distinct regions: a thin upstream region characterized by low mean backflow velocities and a relatively thick downstream region dominated by the intense recirculation of the mean junction vortex.

In the upstream region the turbulence stresses develop in a manner qualitatively similar to those of a two-dimensional boundary layer. This concentrated vortex system is laterally deflected and swept around the base of the wing assumtng a characteristic shape that has led to its name-the `horseshoe' vortex system This generation of `skew-induced' streamwise vortrcity is essentially an inviscid process and so occurs in both laminar and turbulent flow, [11,(21 In aircraft design, juncture flows dominated by leading edge effects occur at Cited by: 3.

Abstract. Instantaneous u-υ signals in the turbulent far wake of a cylinder have been analysed using an extended “quadrant analysis” in order to investigate the Reynolds stress structure and the features of large eddies.

The results indicate that the region between the location of maximum shear and the edge of the wake is similar to the outer layer of boundary layers and bursts of slow Cited by: 1.

spanwise locations by the mean motion in this direction. The shape factor on the attachment line at the wing/fuselage juncture can grow as they travel along the leading edge and cause the flow to become turbulent. The turbulence contamination can then spread over the entire wing surface.

critical Reynolds number exists above which other. A comparison of two differential Reynolds-stress models for aeronautical flows is presented. The model herein combines the Speziale-Sarkar-Gatski pressure-strain model with the Launder-Reece-Rodi model toward the wall, where the length scale is supplied by Menter's baseline equation.

of Reynolds stresses are added directly to the momentum equation instead of employing eddy-viscosity models. The SSG/LRR-!Reynolds stress model was first proposed by Eisfeild and Brodersen [5].

In addition to the original version of the aforementioned Reynolds stress model, a hybrid SSG/LRR-!model was developed by Cecora et al. [1] in Eighteenth Symposium on Naval Hydrodynamics.

Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: / All mean-velocity and Reynolds stress components, some triple products and histograms of fluctuations in all three components have been measured at over points in this flow.

The quantity of experimental data and the variety of. stresses were observed to be less than the tensile elastic limit and the lives long (i.e., greater than about cycles). This pattern of behavior has become known as high-cycle fatigue. Wing fuselage configuration Wing-Fuselage junction flow occurs when the boundary layer on a fuselage encounters an obstacle placed on its surface5.

The result. The present study focuses on the design and analysis of a single-engine, propeller-driven general aviation airplane. Initial weight estimation based on the initial sketch and. The ship model for the experiments is a scale m Series 60 C B = (Figure 1).

The Series 60 C B = is a single-propeller merchant-type ship, a standard for ship-hydrodynamic research, and in particular, was chosen with three other hull types as a representative hull form for the CEP (14).

Investigation of small surface protuberances upstream of turbulent boundary layer separation produced by a skewed shock wave at Mach 3 / Interference drag in a simulated wing-fuselage juncture / (Washington, Mean velocities and Reynolds stresses in a juncture flow /.

Boussinesq Approach vs. Reynolds Stress Transport Models. The Reynolds-averaged approach to turbulence modeling requires that the Reynolds stresses in Equation be appropriately modeled.

A common method employs the Boussinesq hypothesis [ ] to relate the Reynolds stresses to the mean velocity gradients. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account.

Find out more about sending content to Dropbox. Reductions in induced drag by the use of aft swept wing tips. Vol Issue ; C. Burkett (a1)Cited by:. SHEAR Cutting a piece of paper with scissors is an example of a shearing action.

In an aircraft structure, shear (fig.view D) is a stress exerted when two pieces of fastened material tend to separate. Shear stress is the outcome of sliding one part over the other in opposite directions. The rivets and bolts of an aircraft experience both shear and tension stresses.Comparisons of Turbulence Stresses from Experiments against the Attached Eddy Hypothesis in Boundary Layers.

R. Baidya, J. Philip, J. P. Monty, N. Hutchins and I. Marusic Department of Mechanical Engineering The University of Melbourne, VictoriaAustralia Abstract Turbulence stress statistics in a boundary layer at Reτ ≈10,The Wilcox and the SSG/LRR full Reynolds stress turbulence models give improved turbulence predictions over the SST-V two equation turbulence model for this supersonic mixing layer Size: 2MB.